MURDOCH

日本語で読む

12th January 2022

Origins

 

Q: If I didn’t come from Leicester or any of the Midlands counties, I’m pretty sure I’d have to look up Swadlincote on a map. In a town of just 30,000, I’m impressed that you found enough like-minded people there to form a band at all: how did it all come together?

 

M: Well I’ve been in loads of bands before this like you do but originally it started off and I got a bit disillusioned with it all because like you say it was hard finding band members around me. At one time I had band members living in London, some in Hull, Bradford and we’d have to do block rehearsals where we would get together for a week and nail it down like that but it was just a nightmare so I started recording stuff on my own but then I thought I had to get a proper band again. I’m into making beats and doing electronic stuff but it’s nothing like having a set of bollocks behind the drums and feeling the bass drum hitting your legs. It took me ages though. There was a geezer I used to go and see playing in bands named Oggy when I was about thirteen or fourteen and he had just built a studio at his house so when we recorded in there, I roped him in on bass. My ex-girlfriend who is now the singer is Kerry Ann was really shy and didn’t really want to do the gig but was ok to do the recording and I eventually talked her into being in the band. So, yeah, it was hard work getting a lot of like-minded people together and there were a lot of compromises on influences and stuff like that. I didn’t find people who were into stuff like me but I think that worked best in the end because they I bringing something that I probably wouldn’t have got if everyone was into the same stuff.

 

Q: Care to explain the name?

 

M: I’ve always liked the term philharmonic. People think it means orchestra but it’s filhahr-lover-monik - lover of music – so I thought yeah I like that. Deadtime is killing time and ‘Thee’ is just because there are too many ‘The’ bands. I used to like Thee Hypnotics as well.

 

Music and Lyrics

 

Q: These days I prefer two types of bands musically. Either ones that cannot be categorised because they play so many genres or ones that have one genre, Rock, Pop, Punk, etc. As soon as someone says ‘We are a Death Metal Power Prog band’ I lose the will to live let alone listen to them. Your band is of the former; cannot be categorised…

 

M: We are but it goes against the record companies though because they just want to pigeonhole you and sell you in a certain way. When I’ve had meetings with record companies, they’ve said too me ‘You have that song Protected which is a bit Ska, give me ten more songs like that’. This was Mercury records and the same guy who signed Amy Winehouse and I said ‘I don’t work like that mate – I’m not Status Quo’.

 

Q: It’s the way the business is now.

 

M: It is and like you say, there must be thirty sub-genres of Death Metal these days

 

Q: Influences then, who are your musical influences?

 

M: Oh there are so many. I know you shouldn’t listen to the same music as your Mam but me Mam did like some good stuff. She liked some shit as well (laughs) but early Rod Stewart with Ronnie Wood, The Faces, I liked a bit of that. John Lennon…the first time I heard Working Class Hero…The Small Faces as well. Then I think the first record I bought myself when I was a little kid was probably Adam and the Ants; I got into Metal when I was about ten or eleven, Guns ‘n’ Roses and all that but as for influences that have stuck with me and are with me now, Velvet Underground, MC5, The Stooges…

 

Q: But those are even pre-Rod Stewart and a very eclectic mix.

 

M: That’s it, yeah. I always thought I fucking hated Country and Western but I had never heard the proper stuff like Hank Williams. I just like good songs. I also got into electronic music by going to raves so that influenced me a little bit. Being a musician, I just wanted to know how it worked so I got into building beats with samples and we do use a little bit of that in Deadtime for something a bit different. I just didn’t want to be like anyone else really.

 

Q: How about any lyrical influences either songwriters or literature? Youi mentioned Working Class Hero which is a very simple G and Am song so presumably it was the lyrics that got you there.

 

M: Definitely. Even at an early age I got the sentiment of it and when you get older it means more. It’s like a lot of Dylan’s songs in that when you get older, they have a different meaning to you. Lyrically, I like a lot of Hip-Hop because I think a lot of Rock music, especially over the last twenty years seem to be the lowest common denominator of lyrics, almost a means to an end for a band. You know, put any old shit down so we can get the record done and go on tour. I write all the music and lyrics for Deadtime but lyrics I am very particular about and try not to waste words.

 

Politics

 

Q: Your music and lyrics combined paint a bleak picture of the UK (and I’m going to play Devil’s Advocate a bit here – I side with you what I’ve heard), is it really as bad as all that?

 

M: I think it’s getting worse Glenn to be honest. (laughs) The music and lyrics can be a cathartic thing as well, me being in the band and you as a listener. I think that can be an escape for people.

 

Q: There’s a lot of social commentary and anger in your songs and your videos are almost mini-Ken Loach films…

 

M: I like that!

 

Q: …do those storyboards come from witnessing things?

 

M: Yeah. I don’t try and get too literal with the lyrics but the places we filmed all pretty much mean something too me. The kids in the videos, I know their parents and the last video, Hardlines, I got quite emotional watching it back because I know the background those kids are from and how much confidence it’s given them doing something like that. They are opportunities kids like that wouldn’t usually have because they are either laughed at or they haven’t got the resources. It became a little organic community project really without trying.

 

Q: I was your age in the Thatcher years and lived through all that mess but it did get better - for a while at least.

 

M: I was a little kid during the Miner’s Strike so I remember it really well. Me Mam worked at the canteen in the pit, before me Dad fucked off, he worked in the pit and the pit was only just down the road from us so I saw a lot of stuff with the Met coppers so I was always going to militant really, seeing all that.

 

Q: Are you optimistic or pessimistic about the future of Britain?

 

M: I’m always optimistic! I like to think some of the songs have got that bit of hope in them as well. I’m just telling what it is really and the experiences I’ve had. The Metal lyrics we talked about earlier, the dungeons and dragons or the Iron Maiden stuff, I can’t go into a book and write about it, I have to feel an emotional connection with it.

Q: Just to clarify though before we move on; you’re not preaching are you?

 

M: Oh no definitely not.

 

Q: Just observing. James Joyce not Bono.

 

M: Please don’t use Bono in the same sentence. (laughs) You know, it’s a shame about Bono really because U2 did do some great songs back in the day but he just thought he was Jesus didn’t he?

 

Q: Yeah. The crucial point for me was when he stepped off the stage at Live Aid into the crowd trying to grab the headlines and I watched it thinking ‘For fuck’s sake Bono, this isn’t about you’.

M: Exactly but he made it about him didn’t he? I spent a bit of time in Dublin and everybody in Dublin hates him and usually, the Irish, anything Irish and they are on it aren’t they.

 

Q: They are.

 

M: I think that says a lot about the chap. (laughs)

 

Q: I think you’re right. A slight aside here but I’d like to hear your opinion on this. Elvis Costello announced today that he won’t be singing Oliver’s Army anymore as it has the lyric ‘One more widow, one less white nigger’ in it. The Rolling Stones have also said they will not be performing Brown Sugar for a similar reason. What’s your take on all this retrospective self-censorship?

M: I hate it. It’s the same with stand-up comedy as well and I think we’ve had a reverse. The Left Wing used to stand up for freedom of speech and now it seems like the Left are shutting people down with the ‘Cancel Culture’ thing, you can’t say this and you can’t say that and nine times out of ten, the people who are getting offended by it are the people it don’t affect! It’s like a lot of people who go to university who haven’t got their own kind of thing or opinions so they’ll jump on racism, transgender things and they are the ones getting offended. The actual people have usually got a sense of humour about it. It’s like anything in your own life, we have gallows humour about everything don’t we.

 

Q: We do and the British are famous for it.

 

M: Exactly but there are people now who are professionals at being offended by something, getting online straight away and I find if I put something online, someone will come on and say ‘Oh what are you trying to say?’. They are trying to find something that isn’t there.

 

Q: Same here. I’ve been in Facebook jail a couple of times for writing what I thought was innocent enough.

 

M: And me. I think it’s a bit of a Badge of Honour now though.

Q: It is!

 

M: And the thing is that most people agree with you.

 

The Future

 

Q: They do. Well, whatever the future of Britain I think Thee Deadtime Philharmonic have a good future ahead of them once we get this pandemic debacle over and done with. What’s the plans for 2022?

 

M: I have about 26 songs on the go that I am working on so I’ll get them finished off and I also have two songs recorded and I just want to get out there gigging again but everything is so up and down with the covid stuff. We should have been doing a European tour before the first lockdown so between Brexit and covid, it’s just fucked us over.

 

Q: You said 26 songs, a very definite number. You actually have 26?

 

M: Yeah!

 

Q: So the next album will be a double?

M: No because a lot of them won’t make it. I always do more than I need to as I am a king of procrastinating. I can sit for days and do nothing but when I actually do it, I don’t stop for days. I’m about due now to have a writing spree so I’ll finish some of these songs off but what I end up doing is when I’m trying to finish and having a little tinkle, I then think ‘Oh that sounds good’ and then start something new but at least I’m not short of material.

 

Q: Murdoch. Good to talk to you and thanks for doing the interview.

 

M: Really appreciate it mate thank you. Cheers Glenn!

マードック

Thee Deadtime Philharmonic

 

原点

Q: もし私がレスターやミッドランド地方の出身でなかったら、地図でスウェドリンコートを調べなければならないと思います。たった3万人の町で、よくバンドを結成できるほど同じ志を持つ人たちが集まったものだと思います。

 

M:そうだね、僕もみんなと同じように、今までたくさんのバンドをやってきたけど、元々は、おっしゃるように、周りにバンドメンバーを見つけるのが大変で、ちょっと幻滅してしまったんだ。一時期はロンドンやハル、ブラッドフォードにバンドメンバーがいて、ブロック・リハーサルで1週間集まって釘付けになるんだけど、それは悪夢だったから、ひとりでレコーディングを始めたんだ。でも、もう一度ちゃんとしたバンドを組まなきゃと思った。僕はビートを作ったり、エレクトロニックなことをするのが好きなんだけど、ドラムの背後にある諸々の物や、バスドラムが自分の脚に当たる感触は何物にも代えがたいんだ。でも、何年もかかったよ。僕が13歳か14歳の頃、よくバンド見に行っていたバンドのメンバーでマーク・ノウルズという人がいて、ちょうど彼が自宅にスタジオを建てたので、そこでレコーディングした時に、ベースを彼に頼んだ。僕の元カノで今はボーカルのケリー・アンは本当にシャイで、ライブはやりたがらなかったけど、レコーディングはOKだったので、結局バンドに入るように説得したんだ。だから、同じ志を持つ人たちを集めるのは大変だったし、影響を受けた音楽とかで妥協することもたくさんあった。僕と同じようなものに夢中になっている人はいなかったけれど、結果的にはそれが一番良かったと思っている。なぜなら、みんなが同じものに夢中になっていたら得られなかったものを、彼らはもたらしてくれたからね。

 

Q:名前の由来を教えてください。

 

M:フィルハーモニーという言葉がずっと好きだったんだ。オーケストラという意味だと思われがちだけど、フィルハー・ラバー・モニック(音楽を愛する人)だから、ああいいなと思っていたんだ。デッドタイムは時間を殺すこと、ジーは「ザ・」のバンドが多過ぎるから。昔はジー・ヒプノティックも好きだったんだけどね。

 

音楽と歌詞

Q: 最近、私は音楽的に2種類のバンドを好みます。たくさんのジャンルを融合したもので、カテゴライズできないものか、ロック、ポップ、パンクなど、ひとつのジャンルをやっているものです。「デスメタル・パワープログレのバンドです」と言われた途端、聴くどころか生きる気力を失います。あなたのバンドは前者で、カテゴライズされない・・・

M:そうなんだけど、レコード会社は囲い込んで、ある方法で売り込みたいだけだから、それは逆効果なんだ。レコード会社と打ち合わせをすると、「<Protected>という曲はちょっとスカっぽいから、ああいう曲をあと10曲くれ。」と言われたことがある。そのレコード会社はマーキュリー・レコードで、エイミー・ワインハウスと契約した人と同じ人だったんだけど、僕は「そんな仕事はしない。僕はステイタス・クオーじゃない。」と言ってやったよ。

 

Q:今のビジネスのあり方ですね。

M:そうだね、そして君が言うように、最近のデスメタルには30ものサブジャンルがあるはずなんだ。

 

Q: 影響を受けた人、音楽的に影響を受けた人は誰ですか?

M:ああ、たくさんあるね。母親と同じ音楽は聴かない方がいいとは思うけど、僕の母親はいいものが好きだった。でも、ちょっとダサいのも好きだった(笑)。ロッド・スチュワートがロニー・ウッドとやってた初期のフェイセズとかね。ジョン・レノン・・・初めて聴いたのは「ワーキング・クラス・ヒーロー」だった。あとスモール・フェイセスもね。子供時代に初めて自分で買ったレコードは、たぶんアダム・ジ・アンツだったと思う。10歳か11歳のときにメタルに目覚め、ガンズ・アンド・ローゼズやその他にも影響を受けたけど、今でも心に残っているのは、ベルベット・アンダーグラウンド、MC5、ザ・ストゥージズ・・・

 

Q: しかし、それらはロッド・スチュワート以前のものですし、いろいろ混じってますよね。

M:うん、そうなんだ。カントリー&ウエスタンは大嫌いなんだけど、ハンク・ウィリアムスみたいなちゃんとしたのは聴いたことがなかったんだ。ただ、いい曲は好きなんだよ。あと、クラブに行ってエレクトロニック・ミュージックに目覚めたので、その影響も少しあるね。ミュージシャンとして、それがどのように機能するのか知りたかったので、サンプルを使ってビートを作るようになり、デッドタイムでは少し違ったものを使っている。他の誰とも同じになりたくなかったんだ。

 

Q: 作詞で影響を受けたソングライターや文学作品はありますか?「Working Class Hero」は非常にシンプルなGとAmの曲なので、おそらく歌詞に影響されたのだと思いますが。

M:そのとおりだね。幼い頃からその気持ちは伝わっていたし、歳を取れば取るほど、その意味は大きくなる。ディランの多くの曲と同じで、歳をとると意味が違ってくるんだ。歌詞的にはヒップ・ホップが好きだよ。特にここ20年のロックは、歌詞の共通テーマが少なく、バンドにとって目的を達成するための単なる手段になっているように思うからね。どんな古い曲でもいいから、レコードを完成させ、ツアーに出られるようにね。デッドタイムは僕が作曲と作詞を担当しているんだけど、歌詞にはかなりこだわっていて、無駄な言葉を使わないようにしているんだ。

政治

 

Q: あなたの音楽と歌詞を合わせると、イギリスの暗い絵が描かれますが(ここで少し悪魔の代弁者を演じるつもりだ-私が聞いたことはリスナーの立場として、だ)、本当にそれほど悪いのでしょうか?

M:正直なところ、グレンも日に日に悪くなっていると思うよ(笑)。音楽や歌詞は、バンドにいる僕やリスナーのみんなにとってもカタルシスとなるものだ。それは人にとっての逃げ場にもなると思うんだ。

 

Q: あなたの曲には社会的なコメントや怒りの表現が多く、ビデオはまるでケン・ローチの短編映画のようですが・・・

 

M:いいこと言うねー!

 

Q:ああいうストーリー仕立ては、目撃談から生まれるのですか?

M:そうだね、歌詞はあまり直接的なものにはしないようにしているけど、撮影した場所はすべて僕にとって意味のあるものばかりなんだ。ビデオに出てくる子供たち、彼らの親も知っているし、最後のビデオ「Hardlines」を見返すと、とても感情的になってしまう。なぜなら、あの子供たちがどういう環境で育ってきたか、ああいうことをすることでどれだけの自信を得たかがわかるからだ。なぜなら、あのような子供たちは、笑われたり、チャンスがなかったりして、普段は手に入れることのできない機会を得ているからなんだ。このプロジェクトは、本当にちょっとした有機的なコミュニティ・プロジェクトになったんだよ。

 

Q: 私はサッチャー政権時代にあなたの年齢で、あの混乱期を生き抜きました。

M:炭鉱労働者のストライキがあった頃、僕はまだ小さかったから、よく覚えているんだ。父さんが解雇される前、母さんは炭坑の食堂で働いていて、炭坑はうちからすぐのところにあったから、警視庁の警官と一緒にいろんなものを見て、いつも過激になってたんだ。

 

Q:イギリスの将来について、楽観的ですか、それとも悲観的ですか?

M:僕はいつも楽観的だよ!(笑)。曲の中にも少しは希望が含まれていると思いたい。ただ、ありのままの自分と、自分が経験したことを伝えているだけなんだ。さっき話したメタルの歌詞、「ダンジョンズ&ドラゴン」やアイアン・メイデンのような架空の世界のことを僕は書くことはできないし、感情的なつながりを感じなければならないんだ。

 

Q:先に進む前にはっきりさせておきたいのですが、あなたは説教をしているわけではないのですよね?

M:いやいや、それは絶対に違うよ。

 

Q:ただ観察しているだけ。ジェームズ・ジョイスであって、ボノではない。

M:ボノと同じにしないでよ(笑)。U2は昔、素晴らしい曲をいくつも作っていたのに、彼は自分をイエスだと思い込んでいたんだろうね?

 

Q:そうですね。私にとって決定的だったのは、彼がライブエイドのステージから観客の中に入っていって、明日の見出しになるような行為をした時でした。それを見て私は、「何をするんだ、ボノ。君らしくない。」と思いましたよ。
 

M:その通りなんだけど、彼はそれを自分らしいと思ってしまったんだよね。ダブリンで少し過ごしたんだけど、ダブリンの人たちはみんな彼を嫌っていた。たいていアイルランド人は、アイルランド人なら何でもいいって感じなのにね。

 

Q:そうなんです。

M:あれはあの男のことをよく表していると思うね(笑)。

 

Q:おっしゃる通りだと思います。ここで少し余談ですが、ご意見を伺いたいと思うのですが、エルヴィス・コステロは今日、「Oliver's Army」には「One more widow, one less white nigger」という歌詞があるため、もう歌わないと発表したそうです。ローリング・ストーンズも同様の理由でBrown Sugarを演奏しないと言っています。このような回顧的な自己検閲について、あなたはどのようにお考えですか?


M:最悪だね。スタンダップ・コメディでも同じで、逆になってしまったと思うんだ。左翼はかつて言論の自由のために立ち上がったが、今は左翼が「文化を取り締まれ」「あれも言えない、これも言えない」と人々を締め上げているように見える。そして十中八九、それに腹を立てているのは、それが影響しない人々なんだよ!(笑)。大学に通う多くの人は、自分自身の信念や意見を持っていないので、人種差別やトランスジェンダーのことに飛びつき、まるで彼らこそが守られる側に立っているみたいだ。実際の人たちは、たいていユーモアのセンスを持っている。自分の人生でもそうだけど、僕たちは何事にも胆力のあるユーモアで乗り切っていかなきゃね。

 

Q:そうですね、その点でイギリスは有名です。

M:その通りなんだけど、今は何かに腹を立ててすぐにネットにアップするプロフェッショナルな人たちがいて、僕がネットに何かをアップすると、誰かがやってきて「ああ、何を言いたいんだ?」とくる。彼らは、そこにないものを探そうとしているんだよ。

 

Q:こちらも同じですよ。無実だと思うことを書いて、何度かFacebookの刑務所に入ったことがあります。

M:僕もだ。でも、今はちょっと名誉なことだと思っているよ。

 

Q: ですよね!

M:そして、ほとんどの人があなたに同意しているということだよ。

未来

 

Q:そうなんです。まあ、イギリスの未来がどうであれ、このパンデミック騒ぎが終われば、ジー・デッドタイム・フィルハーモニックには素晴らしい未来が待っていると思います。2022年の予定は?

M:26曲ほど制作中の曲があるから、それを完成させるし、2曲ほどレコーディングもしたし、またギグに出たいんだけど、Covidの件ですべてがアップダウンしているんだ。最初のロックダウンの前にヨーロッパツアーをやるべきだったのに、BrexitとCovidの間で、僕たちはめちゃくちゃにされてしまった。

 

Q:26曲と、とても明確な数をおっしゃいましたね。実際に26曲あるんですか?

M:そうだよ!

 

Q:では、次のアルバムは二枚組になるのでしょうか?


M:いや、間に合わないのが多いから。僕は先延ばしの王なので、いつも必要以上にやってしまうんだ。何日も座って何もしないこともあるけど、実際にやるとなると何日も止まらないんだ。今、作曲ラッシュを迎えているので、これらの曲のいくつかを仕上げるつもりだけど、結局やってしまうのは、仕上げようとしている時に、「ああ、いい感じだ」と思ってちょっと小躍りして、新しいことを始めてしまうんだ。でも少なくとも材料不足ってことはないね。

 

Q:マードック、話せてよかったです。インタビューに答えてくれてありがとうございました。

M:こちらこそありがとう。グレンに乾杯!

Thee Deadtime Philharmonic.jpg