ALAN ANTON

日本語で読む

21st January 2017

Early Days

 

Q: Welcome back; it’s been a while…

 

AA: Yeah! Twenty-seven years or something like that. We’ve only been here once. There was always talk for a couple of years that we were going back to Japan but it never happened.

 

Q: Over thirty years together and you are one of the few bands in the world that have never changed line-ups.

 

AA: That’s true.

 

Q: What’s the secret?

 

AA: We still love what we’re doing, three of the four are family which can be bad or good but in this case it’s good. I’m the one that’s not so I get to be the cop. (smiles)

 

Q: There’s never been any Ray/Dave Davies or Oasis moments though have there?

 

AA: No I’ve been waiting for it! I’ve known them since kindergarten so we’ve all grown up together. 

 

Q: One quick question about Whites Off Earth Now!! before we move onto more current things: Your debut was a selection of Blues greats with one original contribution and I’ve often wondered why there was just the one and really, why one at all? Why not just make it a complete Blues covers album?

 

AA: Yeah…I’m trying to remember to…It was written on that day, I guess Michael was thinking about writing at that point and the first time they ever did I think was the day we recorded the record. We did it all live in our garage with a single microphone – just like the Trinity Sessions – and that was our first attempt at the one mic thing so that’s why we did it again but yeah, just at the end of that long day, Mike thought we had the sound set up and the space so let’s try to get this song. They were in there for twenty minutes, recorded it and it sounded great and just decided to put it with those other tracks. We didn’t really think ‘Why is it there?’ or anything; it just sounded good.

 

Q: Since then, you’ve all grown up, got families, other commitments other than the band, how do you balance all that?

 

AA: Well you know, the touring schedule goes from the first decade when you’[d be out nine months of the year and the second is seven months and it keeps going down so that’s a big part of the equation – not being away for long as a stretches at a time. It’s usually two weeks at the most these days so we are able to maintain our families. You grow into things and the band balances along with that. It’s still really exciting though when we get together away from the families whether it’s to record or play somewhere. It’s like being at Band Camp on the tour bus – free again. (smiles)

 

Q: Are you all still in Toronto?

 

AA: They are. I’ve been out west on Vancouver Island for twenty years now.

 

Notes Falling Slow

 

Q: For your Notes Falling Slow set, you chose a point in your career between 2001 and 2007. Why that era?

 

AA: Just that we were talking about a few of those songs from those records when we were back out on the road and we all realized we had a sort of collective amnesia about it because we kind of kids at the time. Then when we delved into our demos and stuff, we found we had all these tracks that we had forgotten about. A lot of them we redid, some were just remixed, which ended up as a new record that we put with the package. So rediscovering those songs just made it seem like the right thing to do.

 

Q: Any more stuff that you may have forgotten about?

 

AA: Not to that extent, no. That was quite a lot and we were surprised by that. There’s a song here or there probably but not much.

 

Q: Is it possible to explain what happened between back then and recently to get Cold Evening Wind to the point you wanted it?

 

AA: It was interesting rerecording a lot of those ideas because we see them completely differently now. It was an idea from back then but we applied our experience now towards it. It happened very quickly as well. We didn’t labour it too much; we just kind of knew what it needed.

 

Songwriting and Recording

 

Q: How do you record? As a band?

 

AA: Pretty much. We do whatever we can live. The stuff that we’ll have trouble with – things leading into other things – we’ll do later but we do try to get it all at once. We’ve always been like that because that’s how we play. At f were always kind of terrified of going into the studio but that’s why we ended up with this guy who had the one microphone. He said we won’t touch it, won’t take it apart which is what we loved because that’s what we thought the recording process was all about – ripping it apart and then trying to figure out how to make it work by putting it all back together again. We still are in a way so we do keep it to a minimum.

 

Q: So if Michael comes in with a new song, what’s the process you go through after that? Does he pretty much have your parts worked out or are you all give a free reign to come up with your parts?

AA: Sometimes he does and sometimes he doesn’t. Sometimes he leaves us to find a groove on it.

 

Q: How long does it take to work out?

 

AA: We use the Elton John approach. He got his lyrics from Bernie Taupin who lived in Los Angeles via snail mail, he’d open them, sit down at the piano and he said ‘If the melody doesn’t come to me in five minutes, I put it aside. I may try it later or just forget about it.’ We always loved that idea and we do that all the time so that’s sort of become our philosophy too. If it doesn’t come right away, give it time and try it again later.

 

Q: At what point does Jeff (Bird) come into it?

 

AA: We found Jeff right away actually. He came in on the second album (The Trinity Sessions) to vary the sound a little bit by playing other instruments. He came recommended but I forget from whom and he found all the others. He was like the muso guy and he’s been with us since then, live and on record. For new material, he’s not there at the start but if we hear a part for him we’ll bring him in.

 

Covers

 

Q: You do do some extraordinary cover versions…

 

AA: Yeah that’s sort of how we started. We realized we had a sound just playing and our idea at the beginning was to just not write songs. We would play other people’s songs and apply our sound to it which is what the first album is and half the second.

 

Q: Where did that sound come from?

 

AA: We’ve analyzed it and what it really was is when we were first jamming together as a band, there was a third brother who played guitar. It sounded quite like The Grateful Dead because he sounded quite jangly and filled up the space. We tried that for a while, trying to decide what kind of band we wanted to be and then he decided he didn’t want to be in the band anymore and so the first day when we got together and played without him, we thought it was really cool because there was all this space in the music. We didn’t realize how much space he had taken up and it was a lot because he played 12-String as well so we just did the same songs we had been doing without him and that’s it, purely by accident.

 

Q: When the Cowboy Junkies take on a cover, everyone knows it’s going to be something quite different. How do you approach the arrangement for it; something like Run For Your Life where you’ve not only changed the arrangement and feel but also the message in the song?

 

AA: I guess it was a comment by someone who suggested it was misogynistic and why would we want to do that and we said ‘yeah it is!’ So we decided to give it a really aggressive feel because of that comment. I guess that came across.

 

Q: It certainly did. Dead Flowers as well.

 

AA: Yeah we did that after we had been touring with Townes Van Zandt for a while. He was doing it in his set – a beautiful cover of it – so we decided to try and do it as well. A nod to Townes for sure.

 

Other Stuff

Q: You as a band have had great success, a long time before the internet and file sharing and everything and you’ve been on both major and independent labels so you are in a rather unique position to answer this or at least be a good judge of it: how do you feel about the current state of the music business and what advice would you give to someone starting out today?

 

AA: That’s tough to answer because we had that luxury of selling records once and all formats, coming up in a world where that was how you listened to music. You bought a record which paid royalties and then came if you don’t buy it you’re going to kill music and there’s still that balance: if you can’t support yourself, how are you going to keep making music? It’s always going to be a hobby and you can’t really commit to it. There really isn’t an answer other than you have to figure it out yourself. You have to be able to multi-task which I know a lot of people can’t – I don’t know if I could do all that, learn all the digital stuff and do social media and all that.

 

Q: So if you were a young lad of fifteen or so now…

 

AA: I wouldn’t be able to do it. All I would want to do is play music. I wouldn’t want to do all that stuff and nobody’s going to do it for me because there’s no money in it for them at first so it’s tough.

 

Q: A harsh, realistic answer.

AA:  Well I don’t want to sugar coat it because I just don’t see it being good. You could kill yourself playing live but a lot of people can’t do that either or they don’t want to.

 

Q: How’s the live scene in Canada these days?

 

AA: It’s good! I don’t know if it’s as good as the US or here because ticket prices in North America have sky-rocketed in that last ten years. You pay $150 to see a band these days which is a lot! You know, you and your wife go to the gig, babysitter, etc and it’s $500. I guess it’s part of the not-buying-records-thing but it’s a finite world of money out there and people can’t pay $100 every week to see a band.

 

Q: Have you ever met a Beatle?

 

AA: No. They are tough to meet. The closest we got I guess was we saw Paul once at either Glastonbury or Reading – one of those festivals in England – and it was a very weird situation. We had been on earlier in the evening around five o’clock or something and that night was Elvis Costello and there were rumours that Paul was coming to play with him. The rumours built up over two hours and sure enough, the security tightened up over those two hours so we knew something was definitely happening. The security actually came in to where we were eating in the catering tents backstage and I guess we were eating burgers or something because he said ‘Guys, you’ll have to get rid of those. Can’t have those around.’ and we said ‘Why?’ to which he replied, ‘Well Paul McCartney is coming and he’s vegetarian and he doesn’t want to see anybody eating meat.’ (laughs)

 

Q: He’s that strict?

 

AA: He’s that strict – yeah. We were taken out. We weren’t even allowed to sit in there because he’s that famous. They cleared the whole space of non-essential personnel, he walks through, does his set and walks out. So no. We thought ’Yeah! We’re gonna meet Paul McCartney!’ but we were not even close.

 

Q: Mr Anton, thank you very much for your time and opinions. It won’t be another twenty-seven years ‘til the next time will it?

 

AA: (laughs) I hope not – we wouldn’t make it.

アラン・アントン(ベース)

初期

Q:また日本へようこそ。えらく間が空きましたね・・・・

AA:そうだね!27年ぶりかな。日本には前に来たきりだったね。ここ数年、日本にまた行きたいなと話していたところだったんだ。でもその機会に恵まれなくてね。

 

Q:同じメンバーでもう30年以上もずっと一緒にやっているバンドは世界でも稀ですよね。

AA:そうだね。

 

Q:何かその秘訣はあるのでしょうか?

AA:自分たちのやっていることを楽しんでいるし、4人のうちの3人は家族だから、良い面も悪い面もあるけど、バンドということでは良い面が出ているね。もしこれをやってなかったら、僕は警官にでもなっていたかもね(笑)。

 

Q:レイとデイヴ・デイヴィス兄弟やオアシスのような揉め事はこれまでなかったのですか?

AA:なかったんだ。そういうのに憧れてるんだけどね!僕たちは、幼稚園の時から一緒に育ってきた仲だからね。

 

Q:いろいろな質問の前に『Whites Off Earth Now!!』についてお聞きしたいのですが。あなた方のデビュー盤は、1曲のオリジナル以外はブルースのカバーでしたよね。私はしばしばなぜあれで終わってしまったのだろう?と思っていたんです。全曲ブルースのアルバムを作る気はなかったのですか?

AA:うーん、当時のことを思い出そうか・・・あの曲を書いた時、マイケルと初めて作曲のことについて話していたんだ。レコーディングの初日のことだったと思う。1本のマイクを立てたガレージでライブ録音をしたんだ。「トリニティ・セッション」みたいにね。僕たちにとっては初めての試みだった。で、長かったその日の終わり頃にマイクがまだやれるぞということで、あの曲をやったんだ。20分も演奏して、それをレコーディングした。とてもいいサウンドだったよ。それでこの曲も収めようということにした。なぜこの曲だけ?と訊かれたら、サウンドが良かったから、というのがその理由だよ。

 

Q:それ以来、あなた方はビッグになり、それぞれが家庭も持ち、活動は広がっていきました。それらすべてをどううまくやり繰りしていますか?

AA:デビューして最初の10年はツアーに明け暮れていた。一年のうち9ヶ月ツアーに出たし、2回目のツアーも7ヶ月やった。徐々に減ってきているけど、ツアーが活動の中心だったんだ。当時はやむを得なかった。最近のツアーは2週間くらいだから、家族と過ごす時間も持てているよ。やっていく中でやり繰りはできていくものさ。家族と離れていても、レコーディングやライブをバンドでやっていくというのは今でも楽しいものなんだよ。ツアー・バスでキャンプに行くみたいな感覚だね。自由そのものさ(笑)。

 

Q:ずっとトロントに住んでいるのですか?

AA:みんなそうだよ。もう20年くらいヴァンクーヴァー島の西エリアで暮らしているんだ。

『Notes Falling Slow』のこと

Q:ボックスセット『Notes Falling Slow』には、2001年から2007年までの間の作品が選ばれていますが、なぜこの時期だったのですか?

AA:ツアーに出ていた時に、それぞれのアルバムの曲のことを話していて、すっかり忘れていた曲のことを思い出したんだ。当時はバタバタしてて気づかなかったから。そこでデモを当たり直して、忘れ去られていた曲をいろいろ見つけたというわけさ。やり直した曲もあったし、リミックスしたものもあった。それで完成させて収めたんだ。再発見して、あるべき形で世の出せてよかったと思っているよ。

 

Q:あの他にも忘れている曲はないですか?

AA:いや、もうないよ。結構たくさんあって驚いたけどね。まだあるのかもしれないけど、あっても僅かだね。

 

Q:「Cold Evening Wind」ができるまでのいきさつを教えていただきたいのですが。

AA:いろいろなアイデアをぶっ込んだから、あのレコーディングは楽しかったよ。今では、まったく別の見方をしているけどね。当時はああいうアイデアを盛り込んだんだけど、今では自分たちの経験が込められていたんだなと感じているんだ。とにかく急造で仕上げた。あまり働いた気がしなかったくらいさ。思い通りにやったってだけだった。

 

曲作りとレコーディング

Q:レコーディングはどのようにしているんですか?バンドとして一緒にやるのですか?

AA:ほとんどそうだよ。ライブでやれそうなことは何でもやってみる。行き詰まるようなことがあると、一旦置いておいて後で取り掛かる。で、すぐに仕上げるんだ。いつもそんな感じだよ。それが僕たちのやり方だからね。スタジオに入ると不安もつきまとうけど、1本のマイクを取り囲んでとにかくやるしかないからね。近づき過ぎるな、離れるな、って言われるんだけど、それがまた面白いところだよ。僕たちにとっては、こういうのがレコーディングなんだって思っているんだ。解体してからまた合体させる。これが僕たちのやり方だって思うようにしている。まだ鋭意努力中だよ。とことん極めるつもりさ。

 

Q:マイケルが新曲を持ってきた場合、それをどうしていくのですか?彼がそれぞれのパートを指示するのか、それぞれが自分のパートを自分で考えるのか?

AA:彼が指示することもあるし、しないこともあるよ。メンバーがそれぞれで答えを出すまで放っておくこともある。

 

Q:1曲を仕上げるのにはどれくらいの時間がかかりますか?

AA:僕たちは「エルトン・ジョン方式」でやっているんだ。彼はロサンゼルスに住むバーニー・トーピンから封書で詞をもらって、それからピアノに座るんだ。「5分経ってもメロディが浮かばなかったら、ちょっと置いておこう。またやる気になるか、忘れてしまうかはその時次第だ。」っていうものさ。こういうやり方が気に入っているんだ。いつもこの方法でやっているよ。これが今や僕たちのレコーディング哲学にもなっているね。すぐに仕上げられなかったら、しばらく置いておいて、また後でチャレンジするんだ。

 

Q:どの時点でジェフ(・バード)は絡んでくるのですか?

AA:すぐに絡んでくるよ。セカンド・アルバム(『The Trinity Sessions』)では、他の楽器をプレイしてくれてサウンドに色を添えてくれた。彼のことは誰かに薦められて参加してもらったんだけど、彼はすぐに必要なものに気づいたんだ。彼はまさにミュージシャンズ・ミュージシャンだね。それ以来、ずっと一緒にやっているよ。レコードでもライブでもね。新曲を扱う時には彼はいないけど、ここは彼のパートだなと僕たちが感じると、彼を呼ぶんだ。

カバー曲について

 

Q:あなた方はずば抜けたカバー・バージョンも出していますよね・・・・

AA:ああ、初期にはあのアプローチしかなかったんだ。自分たちらしいサウンドとアイデアでやるにはもってこいだと気づいたんだよ。他人の曲をやって、自分たちらしさを出せるだろう、ってね。デビュー・アルバムの大半がカバーだったね。

 

Q:あのサウンドは何から影響を受けたものなのですか?

AA:自分たちで考えるに、最初の頃にジャムってた時のサウンドじゃないかって思うんだ。三男坊がギターをやってた頃のね。まるでグレイトフル・デッドのようなサウンドだった。騒々しくて、音がぎっちり詰まっているような。しばらくやっているうちに、これこそが僕たちのバンドのサウンドだと思うようになったんだ。でも奴はバンドでやる気はないと言ったから、彼抜きでみんなと一緒にやった最初の日にこれだ、って思ったんだよ。僕たちの居場所があるサウンドだった。彼の貢献度がどれほどだったかは本人も分かっていなかったけど、それは大きいものだったんだ。彼は12弦もプレイしたしね。だから僕たちは彼抜きで同じ曲を同じようにやってみたんだ。まさにやむを得ず、だよ。

 

Q:カウボーイ・ジャンキーズのカバー曲は、どこか違うって聴いたみんなが思います。曲のアレンジはどうしているのですか?「Run For Your Life」なんて、アレンジもですが、詞のメッセージさえ変えているように思いますが。

AA:誰かがあの曲は「女嫌い」の奴の歌だって言ってたけど、僕たちがあれをやってみようと思ったのは、「これだ!」って思ったからなんだ。だからもっと攻撃的にしようと決めた。そういう歌だってことだからね。違和感はなかったと思うよ。

 

Q:「Dead Flowers」もやってますよね。

AA:ああ、“Townes Van Zandt”としばらくツアーをしたことがあってね。彼がこの曲をセットに組んでて、素晴らしい出来だった。だから僕たちもこの曲をカバーしようと決めたんだ。タウンズも納得してくれると思うよ。

その他諸々

 

Q:あなた方はインターネットが出現する遥か前に成功を収めました。レーベルはメジャーとインディと両方に所属してきました。そういう意味では非常にユニークな存在としてこの質問に答えていただけるのではないかと思うのですが、最近の音楽ビジネスについてはどう思われますか?これから音楽界でやっていこうとすれば、どんなアドバイスをしますか?

AA:これは答え難い質問だね。僕たちは一旦成功すれば、あらゆる音楽を聴くメディアに対応しなきゃならないからね。レコードを買えばロイヤリティを払う仕組みになっていて、レコードを買わないなら、音楽の未来はない。そのバランスは今も健在なんだ。その世界で自分たちを生かしていけないなら、どうやって音楽を作り続けていける?単なる趣味の世界で終わってしまうよ。それに気づくしかないと思うよ。今は同時にいろいろなことをしなきゃならない。それができない人が多いよ。僕がすべてできるかと言われれば分からないけど。デジタルのすべてを勉強してSNSにも対応しなきゃね。

 

Q:もしあなたが今、15歳かそこらの少年だったとしたら・・・

AA:まともな音楽活動はできないだろうね。僕がやりたいのは音楽を演奏することだけだ。他のことなんてどうでもいいし、誰にも強制される筋合いはない。まず、業界は金になるかどうかだけを考えるんだよ。だから難しいね。

 

Q:厳しく、現実的なお答えでした。

AA:見せかけの自分になんてなりたくないよ。それは決していいことだとは思えないからね。ライブではすぐに化けの皮が剥がれるよ。その憂き目に遭っている人は多いよ。それともそういう人はライブをやりたくないのかもしれないけど。

 

Q:最近のカナダのライブ・シーンはどんなですか?

AA:元気だよ!アメリカや日本ほど活気づいているかどうかは分からないけど。北米でのコンサート・チケットの価格はここ10年でうなぎ上りだ。あるバンドを観るのに150ドルも払うんだよ。こんな例はざらだ!君と奥さんと子守で一緒に観に行けば、500ドルもかかる。これはレコードが売れないことの弊害だと思っているんだ。でもそれにも限界というものがあるよ。毎週ライブに100ドルずつ払うなんてできないことだからね。

 

Q:ビートルズのメンバーに会ったことはありますか?

AA:いいや。会うのは難しいよ。一番会えそうだったのはポールだったけどね。グラストンベリーかレディングかの、イギリスでのフェスティバルでね。変な状況だったんだよ。朝5時くらいという、えらく早い時間に僕たちは会場に入ってね。その日はエルヴィス・コステロが出演する予定だった。ポールが彼と共演するという噂があったんだ。そんな噂が2時間ほどで広まって、実際に警備体制が厳しくなった。だから何かが起こるぞと思っていたんだ。セキュリティが楽屋のケータリング・エリアにも詰めてた。僕たちはハンバーガーか何かを食べてたんだ。すると、警備員が「君たち、それを片付けてくれるかな?持ってうろついちゃだめだよ。」と言ったんだ。「どうしてだい?」と訊くと、「ポール・マッカートニーが来るからだ。彼はベジタリアンだから、肉を食ってる人を見るのも嫌なんだ。」と言ったんだ(笑)。

 

Q:それほどポールは厳格なのですか?

AA:ああ、彼は厳格だよ。だから僕たちは出て行った。そこに居ることも許されなかったんだ。有名なポールがやって来るってことでね。警備員たちは、そこを人の気配がなかったかのようにきれいに片づけた。ポールがやって来て、演奏して帰って行ったよ。だから会ってないんだ。僕たちは、「ポールに会えるぞ!」って思ったんだけどね。でも近づくことさえできなかったよ。

 

Q:アントンさん、今日はお時間を割いていただきありがとうございました。今度はもう27年も経たないうちにお会いしたいですね。

AA:(笑)そう願うよ。だぶん大丈夫だよ。