BRUCE PEGG

日本語で読む

27th March 2017

Q: In your opinion, was he the Father of Rock ‘n’ Roll?

 

BP: Well if not the father then at least one of the people that was at Ground Zero. Everything really came out of Memphis, St. Louis or Chicago. In Memphis you had Sam Phillips and Sun Records and in Chicago you had Chess Records. And in the mid-western states at that time you had radio, which was pretty close to its apex, and the population in that area is being blasted with black R& B stations and white C & W stations. Kids didn’t care if it was black or white – the parents did but the kids didn’t –and if you take those two things and mix them up you get Chuck Berry. He deliberately tried to sing in a smoother voice than a lot of his black contemporaries such as Big Joe Turner or Little Richard. If you listen to those guys and compare it to Chuck’s voice, you can hear exactly what Chuck is saying whereas with some of those others, you can’t. Nat King Cole was one of Chuck’s heroes and his voice influenced him. Chuck, like any great innovator, wasn’t unique. All he did was take all of these things from different places and put them together in a new package.

 

Q: Such as the intro to Roll Over Beethoven.

 

CB: Chuck took that from Carl Hogan, who was Louis Jordan’s guitar player but Chuck played it on two strings instead of a single string, which he learnt from T. Bone Walker and, to a greater extent, Goree Carter who was a Texas R & B guitar player. He also got the distortion from Goree Carter, too. What you have to remember about all of that is that up until Chuck, the guitar was not a prominent instrument in pop music. You had people like Django Reinhardt and Charlie Christian who were playing jazz, and they would play solos in songs but they were all played on one string. Generally a guitar couldn’t compete with a horn section, which could be ten pieces, so you had to wait until at least the late forties and the advent of electrified instruments for the guitar to become significant. Then you had Ike Turner who punched a whole in a speaker to create distortion and a few others cottoned on to that. What Chuck did was bring it all together into one package. That’s Rock ‘n’ Roll in my opinion.

 

Q: So if not the Father of Rock ‘n Roll, the Father of Rock Guitar.

 

BP: That I would not argue with one jot, and I don’t think anybody else would either. He gave the guitar a vocabulary, which other guitarists went on and extended, but he invented that.

 

Q: He had a reputation for being difficult to work with. The stories of the band hired to play his songs and not being given a set list, etc…why was that?

 

BP: It really starts off with him being a black musician playing in the south of America in the 1950s. He had a couple of guys that managed him for a very brief amount of time and he caught them ripping him off. They would get a head-count at the theatre or wherever he was playing and tell Chuck they were under the head-count and pay him a lot less than his guarantee. He fired them and went out on his own after that and once you do that, you are incredibly vulnerable. As a performer, you stand on a stage and you get a good sense of how many people are out there—50, 75, 100, whatever—and you do a quick head-count and multiply that by what the owner is charging on the door and you come up with a figure. Chuck was very good at maths so at the end of the show he knew that he wasn’t getting his fair share. Add that to the indignities of a black musician playing in the south. Chuck used to over-expose his publicity photos deliberately so that promoters thought they were booking a white act which pissed people off. He got humiliated by crowds; if he made eye contact with a white woman he could get chased out of town. Gradually he learnt to put a mask on and that mask was to be an ornery bastard. Later on he got a bit more savvy about that a developed performance contracts that had very stringent riders. He stipulated exactly what amp he wanted on stage, how long the performance was going to be, and even if the promoter wanted an encore, the promoter would have to pay extra. All of those things were there for his protection and once the word is out to the industry that you are difficult to work with, people approach you differently. Then when he went to jail in 1961 on which was essentially a trumped-up charge, he comes out and Carl Perkins made the famous quote of ‘I’ve never seen a man so changed.’ I personally don’t think it was jail that changed him; I think it was just one more thing. The straw that broke the camel’s back so-to-speak. Don’t forget that when Elvis played, he had an entourage to walk in with; Chuck didn’t even have a band! I can’t imagine how vulnerable he must have felt although we do know that he travelled with a loaded handgun I his car.

 

Q: You met him – how was he to you?

 

BP: Well I was just a fan back then. The first time I met him I wasn’t writing the biography but the second time I was and he was very, very aloof because he knew what I was doing. He refused to look into the camera when I had a photograph taken [which is the photo you see here]. I reached out to him a few times, talked to his son, got his sister Lucy out of the shower with a phone call — she was not pleased — they all shut me out of the whole project but I expected that. Chuck didn’t want anybody to enter his world unless it was on his terms.

 

Q: You have since received praised from him for your book though haven’t you?

 

BP: He himself didn’t say that but I interviewed a number of people that are incredibly close to him. For example, I talked to Billy Peek, who went on to become Rod Stewart’s guitarist, and he liked it, and Joe Edwards, who owns Blueberry Hill restaurant in St. Louis and knew Chuck, well said it was about as close as anyone was ever going to get. 

 

Q: How’s Chuck’s autobiography?

 

BP: Brilliant! Take it with a grain of salt, as you should with every autobiography, but it’s not so much what he wrote but the way he wrote it. It’s 250 pages of “Johnny B. Goode” – written the way he writes a song. He’s fairly forthcoming in it, but of course he only tells you what he wants you to know. And it was written in 1986, before all the tempestuous stuff in the 90s and Johnnie Johnson suing Chuck in 2000.

 

Q: Was “Johnny B. Goode” written for Johnnie Johnson?

 

BP: I don’t think so. I think it was written about Chuck. The phrase “Johnnie B. Goode” comes from the time he was on the road with Johnnie and Johnnie was quite a drinker in his day and would show up for gigs pissed and Chuck would say “Come on Johnnie, be good.”But something I uncovered in my research was that Langston Hughes, one of the great Black writers in the 30s/40s/50s, had a column in the Chicago Tribune called “Jesse B. Simple,” which centered around a black everyman who spoke about the black experience. I think that’s what “Johnny B. Goode” was really about – the fact that you can be a black kid from a black neighborhood in St. Louis and rise to the top.

 

Q: “School Days” and “No Particular Place To Go” are rather similar: was he the first guy to copy himself?

 

BP: Ha ha! Well Chuck’s songs are all really simple, and he never really wanted to stretch himself. He never got to the level where he could do a Sgt. Pepper or Pet Sounds or Tommy – that was just beyond his limit. When he came out of prison in 1963, he just grafted the lyrics he had written in there onto existing songs. That was just his way of doing it. His lyrics from ‘64/’65 were just incredible: “Nadine,”“No Particular Place To Go,”“Promised Land,”“C’est La Vie” were all just brilliant songs.

 

Q: Probably his finest lyrically.

 

BP: I wouldn’t disagree with that.

 

Q: Did he have a guitar in prison?

 

BP: I don’t know, but I can tell you one thing about his time in prison which is in his autobiography. He was writing the lyrics to “Promised Land” and he went to the prison library and asked if he could see a map of the USA to make sure the journey he describes in the song was accurate. And the guards refused to let him see one, because they thought he was going to break out and make a run for it! (laughs)

 

Q: Bruce, thanks very much for this

 

BP: My pleasure mate. Speak soon.

 

Further reading:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/537226.Brown_Eyed_Handsome_Man

 

https://brucepegg.com/2017/03/26/chuck-berry-and-me/
 

https://brucepegg.com/2015/03/01/chuck-berry-roll-over-beethoven/

 

 

ブルース・ペグ インタビュー

2017年3月27日

Q:あなたの見解では、彼が「ロックンロールの父」ですよね?

ブルース・ペグ(以下BP):ああ、もし「生みの親」でないとしても、創成期にそこにいた人の一人であったことは間違いないね。すべてはメンフィス、セントルイス、シカゴから始まったんだ。メンフィスではサム・フィリップスがサン・レコードを興し、シカゴにはチェス・レコードがあった。当時のアメリカ中西部では、黒人向けのR&Bのラジオ局と白人向けのカントリー&ウェスタンのラジオ局とが隆盛を極めていた。そのエリアの人々はどちらかに夢中になっていたんだよ。ガキどもは、黒や白なんて気にしちゃいなかった。親は気にしていたけどね。この2つをミックスして、新しいものを作り出したのがチャック・ベリーだったんだよ。チャックは、意図的にビッグ・ジョー・ターナーやリトル・リチャードなどの当時流行りの奴らよりも丁寧に歌ったんだ。彼らとチャックの歌を聴き比べたら、チャックの言葉の方がちゃんと聞き取れると思うよ。ナット・キング・コールがチャックの憧れの存在の一人だったんだ。だから彼の歌にチャックは影響を受けていた。えてして先駆者というものは、別に変わり者っていうわけじゃなかったんだよ。彼がやったことと言えば、いろいろな場所で起こっていたことをまとめて、新しいパッケージにして出したことだね。

 

Q:「Roll Over Beethoven」のイントロのような、ね。

BP:チャックはああいうのを、ルイス・ジョーダンのバック・ギタリストだったカール・ホーガンのプレイをヒントにして編み出したんだよ。でもチャックは、シングルノートではなくダブルノートでプレイしたんだ。それを彼はT.ボーン・ウォーカーとテキサス出身のR&Bギタリストだったロリー・カーターのプレイから採り入れたんだ。チャックが出てくるまでは、ギターというのは注目される楽器じゃなかったんだ。それは憶えておいてほしいね。ジャンゴ・ラインハルトやチャーリー・クリスチャンなどはジャズをプレイしてソロを取っていたけど、シングルノートでプレイした。ギターは、時に10人編成にもなるホーン・セクションとは比べものにはならなかったからね。40年代末期にエレクトリック・ギターが生まれて初めてギターが台頭してきたんだよ。アイク・ターナーが歪んだ音を出すアンプでプレイしたりしていたけど、チャックはそういったテクニックをすべて一つにして表現したんだ。それが「ロックンロール」ってやつだったんだよ。

 

Q:ロックンロールの父でなくても、ギターの父でしたね。

BP:何か一つのことでそう言うつもりはないよ。他の人もそうだと思うけどね。チャックはギターに表現力を与えたんだ。それを後のギタリストが発展させていったけど、彼が「発明者」なんだ。

 

Q:彼は共演し難い人という評判でした。バックバンドを雇っても、セットリストをバンドに渡さない、とか。それはなぜだったのでしょう?

BP:彼は50年代にアメリカの南部の黒人とプレイしてキャリアをスタートした。短い期間、彼をマネージメントして搾取していた人物が何人かいたんだ。彼がどこでプレイしようとも、劇場に入った客の数を数えて、それに応じてギャラを払うという契約だった。でもチャックはいつも実際の客入りに応じた額よりも安いギャラしかもらっていなかったんだ。それで彼はそいつらをクビにし、以降は自分でマネージメントするようになった。そうなってしまうと、信じられないほど弱気になるものなんだ。ステージに立つと、客の数をつい数えてしまう。50人、75人、100人。客入りが多くなってくると、劇場の支配人は入場料を高く引き上げた。チャックは数字には強かったから、適正なギャラが支払われていないと気づいた。それに加えて、南部の黒人ミュージシャンの言動は酷かったからね。チャックはパブリシティ用の写真を配り捲ったんだ。すると、プロモーターは白人の出演者しかブッキングしなくなった。チャックはオーディエンスにも辱めを受けたんだ。もしステージから白人の女性に色目を送ろうものなら、即刻その町から追い出されたんだよ。だから次第にチャックは仮面を被ることにした。「強情」という仮面だよ。でもその後、少しは知識もついたから、まともな契約も結ぶことができたんだ。使うアンプの機種、演奏時間などについて、彼の言い分を通すことができた。プロモーターは、アンコールをしてほしいなら追加のギャラを支払わねばならなかった。こうしたことは、彼の自衛の方法だったんだ。でもそういうことが伝わると、彼は共演し難いとか、とっつき難いとか言われるようになったんだ。1961年に彼が監獄に入れられ、出てきた時の保釈金は完全にでっち上げたものだった。カール・パーキンスの有名な言葉があるよね。「あんなに変わってしまった奴を見たことがない。」って。僕はチャックを変えたのは監獄だとは思わない。「最後の藁がラクダの背中を折る」ってやつさ。監獄入りが、彼のめげる心に追い討ちをかけたんだ。エルヴィスが演奏した時の環境とはまったく違っていたんだよ。チャックにはバンドさえなかったんだから!移動の車にはいつも拳銃を積んでいたと言われていたけど、彼がどれほどびびっていたかは、想像を絶するよ。

 

Q:あなたと出会った時の彼はどうでした?

BP:僕は単なるファンの一人だったからね。初めて彼と出会った時には、彼の伝記は何も書いていなかったけど、二度目に会った時には書き始めていた。だから凄く冷淡な感じだったよ。僕が書いているって知っていたから。僕が写真を撮りたいって言っても断ったしね。何度かアプローチして、彼の息子さんにも話をした。彼の娘さんのルーシーがシャワー中に電話したこともあったよ。喜ばれなかったけどね。彼らは寄ってたかって僕に書かせまいとしていたよ。でも僕は半ばそれを予測していた。彼は、必要がなければ、絶対他人を自分の世界には入れたがらないんだ。

 

Q:でもあなたの本は彼から褒められたのでしょう?

BP:直接は言われていないよ。ロッド・スチュワートのサポート・ギタリストになったビリー・ピークとか、彼ととても親しい人物にインタビューをした時に、チャックがこの本を気に入っていると言っていたし、セントルイスでブルーベリー・ヒルというレストランを経営しているジョー・エドワーズは、これまでにないくらいチャックの実体に迫った本だと言ってくれた。

 

Q:チャックの自伝はどうですかね?

BP:素晴らしいよ!すべての自伝には、眉唾なところもあるのが普通なんだけど、チャックのは、書いてある内容じゃなくて、書き方が素晴らしいんだよ。「Johnny B. Goode」のことで250ページもあるんだ。まるで曲を書くかのように、溢れ出てきている感じなんだ。彼という人は社交的だったけど、でももちろん書きたいことしか書いていない。1986年に書かれたものだから、90年代のゴタゴタや2000年にジョニー・ジョンソンがチャックを訴えたことなんかは書かれていないんだ。

 

Q:「Johnny B. Goode」は、ジョニー・ジョンソンのことを書いたのですか?

BP:いや、そうは思わないね。あれは自分自身のことを書いたんだと思う。「Johnnie B. Goode」という言い回しは、彼がジョニーとツアーしている時に生まれたんだ。ジョニーが一日中酒ばかり飲んでいて、ステージに上がると小便を漏らしていたんだ。それでチャックが、「おい、ジョニー。しっかりしろよ。」って。僕が調査したところでは、ラングストン・ヒューズという30年代から50年代に活躍した立派な黒人記者がいたんだけど、彼がシカゴ・トリビューン紙にコラム欄を持っていて、黒人社会の中心人物だったジェシ・B.シンプルを呼んで、黒人ならではの体験を聞いたんだ。「Johnny B. Goode」 もそんな話だと思うんだ。セントルイスの黒人貧民街に生まれた黒人のガキがのし上がっていく、という話だよ。

 

Q:「School Days」や「No Particular Place To Go」も同じような感じです。彼自身、自分の作品を使い回していたのでしょうか?

BP:ははは・・!チャックの曲はどれもシンプルで、曲を進化させようなんて思ってもいなかった。彼には「サージェント・ペパー」も「ペット・サウンズ」も「トミー」も作れなかったんだ。彼の限界以上のことだからね。1963年に刑務所から出てきた時、既存の曲の歌詞を書き換えた、それが彼のやり方さ。64年、65年頃の彼の歌詞は素晴らしい。 「Nadine」、「No Particular Place To Go」、「Promised Land」、「C’est La Vie」なんて素晴らしいとしか言いようがないね。

 

Q:たぶん彼のベストでしょうね。

BP:いや、そうとも思わないね。

 

Q:彼は刑務所でもギターを弾いていたのでしょうか?

BP:確信はないんだけど、彼の自伝に書いてある刑務所時代の話なんだが、「Promised Land」の歌詞のヒントにはなったそうだ。刑務所の図書館に行って、アメリカ地図を貸してくれと頼んだそうなんだけど、スタッフに断られたんだ。彼らはチャックが地図を破って逃げ去ると思ったそうだよ!(笑)

 

Q:ブルース、今日はありがとうございました。

BP:どういたしまして。また話そう。